The Art of Visual Healing

Posts tagged “Sinclair

As Above So Below: Can We Really Know the Difference?  If So, Where are We Now? Sterling Sinclair Ponders… October 31, 2017

As Above So Below: Can We Really Know the Difference? If So, Where are We Now? Sterling Sinclair Ponders… October 31, 2017
I’m not going to write about it today, but I was urged by my guides to pose these two questions on this Halloween / Samhain day and night: “Where are We?” “Who are We?”

The promp to consider “As Above So Below” was initially brought to my attention when I went to photograph today’s 2017 Talisman my iPhone6 wanted to photo the ceiling.  It was almost impossible to change the camera lense direction.

2017 Halloween Talisman to Inspire Soul Protection
I will let you sit with the above 2 questions as you view these two photos.  

   
 
If you want to read a bit more about “As Above So Below,” this site explains it quite well: 

Site: Explains As Above So Below
Video: As Above So Below Movie Trailer
Much love and many blessings, S

Happy Halloween!  Happy Samhain!

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2017 Halloween Talisman to Inspire Positive Soul Protection: Sterling Sinclair Keeps the Annual Auracature Tradition Alive and Smiling, October 31

2017 Halloween Talisman to Inspire Positive Soul Protection: Sterling Sinclair Keeps the Annual Auracature Tradition Alive and Smiling, October 31
For several years, basically since I began doing Medium and Energy Clearing Work, I have been offering talismans to people on Halloween day and night. 

 Many people are negatively affected by the energies of Halloween night and day.  Why?

The world is a big place and Halloween provides a time in the year whereby people with different motivations celebrate their spiritual beliefs and desires. Slasher movies, canabalism, monsters, necromancy, rituals, hidden faces, accompany the masses trick or treating. It is one of the only times of the year when strangers open their doors to strangers whether it be to give them something to eat and send them on their ways or to invite strangers into their home.  Most activities are fun and happy safe moments that give the masses a time to break from the normal. However, there are people who are frightened, disturbed and become upset by this night. Even families taking the children around door to door, most often end up gossiping, fighting, tired, crying, hot, b–chy, hysterical, sugar high delirious and looking for a stiff drink. 

Personally, I enjoy Halloween. It is the one day a year that I ignore my diabetes. 

If you are one of these people who are negatively affected by this night, maybe a talisman will help. 

Here is this year’s Halloween Talisman,

  
“My Eyes Sparkle

My Soul is My Soul

I Choose Who Sees Me

My Eyes Sparkle

My Soul is My Soul

I Choose Who Sees Me

My Eyes Sparkle

My Soul is My Soul

I Choose Who Sees Me

I Smile a Smile of Joy

I Smile a Smile of Joy

I Smile a Smile of Joy

I Smile a Smile of Joy”
Feel free to print this talisman and stick it around your house, office or simply put it as your computer or mobile screen saver.  You may even print a copy and burn it outside, repeating the above words that were written around the talisman image.  

If this one does not seem to fit you, maybe another one from another year will do the trick:

2016 Halloween Talisman
2014 Halloween Talisman
2013 Halloween Talisman
2012 Halloween Talisman
I can’t seem to find the 2015 Talisman… I wonder where it….

Have yourselves a really safe, fun, and celebratory day and evening. 

Much love and many blessings, S


Do Taboo Deaths Require Silent Grief? Sterling Sinclair Posts about his Nephew’s Death by Suicide Twice on Facebook and Receives One Condolence Comment.  Is such a Response Expected?  If so, why? October 24, 2017

Do Taboo Deaths Require Silent Grief? Sterling Sinclair Posts about his Nephew’s Death by Suicide Twice on Facebook and Receives One Condolence Comment. October 24, 2017  
  

To be fair, my post was a comment with a link to the following post regarding both mention of my nephew’s death and the topic of suicide.  It wasn’t a “I’m feeling down today because I miss him” post, which would have invited a supportive response.  I wrote the post in such a way because I felt that maybe he may be able to save a life out there.  

Link: to the Blog Post Regarding Suicide and the Death of Sterling’s Nephew
I have a Master of Divinity from Victoria University and the University of Toronto. I concentrated my studies and training on counselling – primarily grief/death & dying/infirm/hospice.  

Taboo topics were seldom raised in the university classrooms but were common concerns during my training. The secret pain people carried became even more so prevalent as the people I visited grew older or faced their own approaching death. 

One of the most powerful lessons that I learned was that as we face our own death, we begin to purge ourselves from our guilt, negative perceptions, awful memories, hate, and more than anything else – suppressed grief. 

Before we die, we grieve.

As for accidental death, it is difficult to confirm this pre-death grieving process but if we take a moment and reel back the days before our loved one died by accident, we often recall him/her/they making grief and/or other purge related statements.  

Sometimes, we recall the person’s behaviour changing in ways indicative of the purge.  

We more often than not discount or let the statements and behaviours flow on by. We all do. If you did and missed the signs, you are not alone. With no context – without knowing that an accident is to happen – we simply miss the clues. We must not beat ourselves up if this happened to us.  

When I began offering private spiritual sessions (once I hung up my collar) I was shocked to find the extent of secret pain people carried. I have sat with over 2000 people and well over 80% of them carried this grief. In the cases whereby discussion revolved around the topic, almost all of the people were uplifted after purging or revealing the pain that had been long hidden. 

The most traumatizing pain appeared to be related to taboo causes of death. They were revealed in this decreasing magnitude of silence.

1/ terminating the life of one’s own child (death by accident, termination of pregnancy including miscarriage and abortion, and not noticing the signs that could have possibly stopped the death).

2/ suicide

3/ overdose or laced drug

4/ alcoholism

5/ abuse

6/ murder

So it is no wonder that my posts regarding suicide and the anniversary of my nephew’s death were met with one condolence comment. 

One may be surprised by this list but it appeared in this order over and over again. With that said, many women have argued that they have no grief due to abortion. I have been in enough sessions to witness this to be untrue with the majority of my clients who have terminated their pregnancies. It is for this reason that such death (again considered not death by some because they hold the opinion that an unborn child is not alive), is one that involved suppressed grief. I don’t want to side rail this post with the topic of abortion but I felt that I needed to address the controversy.

Nonetheless, we as a culture of selective public grieving pick and choose what is okay and not okay to grieve over. We have our limits to the type and amount of pain that we can handle. We don’t want to hurt other people’s feelings and we don’t want to publicly portray ourselves as monsters, weak, frail, neglectful, bad, people.  

Many of us are unwilling to mention a topic of suicide and when we do, we wash ourselves clean of any guilt or wrongdoing by posting “get help” phone lines and sharing mental health posts. No matter how we paint the picture, if our loved one dies, we deal with it. No matter the level of pain and loss, we experience pain and loss. 

The silence regarding these taboo deaths needs to stop. They need to be pulled out of our closets and thrown into the centre of the street. In so doing, we can more openly support each other. The silence and secrecy and suppression of our grief, feeds debilitating and self-deprecating thoughts. Our behaviours toward others, especially our loved ones is altered, and far too often altered negatively.   

I knew a man who accidentally ran over his child at a construction site.  He never remembered doing it.   He never could find his way again. Everyone suffered. It was almost never spoken of as the years passed. He grieved alone at night, in the truck driving to work, and in prayer. He built a wall around himself and yet at nighttime when alone, he cried himself to sleep for many years. 

I know a woman whose father shot off his head.  She was a young woman with children and young siblings. She still cannot remove from her memory of cleaning up the remains of her parent. She wanted to do so quickly so that her family would not have to see it too. She changed that day, so too likely her siblings and extended family. She felt that she needed to be strong and silent. She turned to alcoholism and she took her grief-fed-pain and turned it into abusive anger. Only a few people knew of the extent of her pain. Now that she grows older, the nightmares are visiting and interrupting her sleep. She even sleeps in another room from her husband because she doesn’t want him to witness these unconscious expressions of her secrets.

We all deal with death in our own ways. Most of the time, we need to keep on getting on. We need to survive and we need to care for our surviving loved ones. We need to keep moving forward. Let’s face it, getting back to everyday, regular activities can be good medicine but not at the expense of our grief.  

I am kind of hurt that only one friend gave their condolences on Facebook when I posted, but I understand any of the reasons why they may not have wanted to do so.  

  

With that said, I think some friends expressed their condolences by “liking” the post.  Also, I felt heard, however, because some friends shared the post.  It was very brave of them to do so because if just mentioning grieving due to one of these taboo ways to die, then posting about it on social media is waaaaaaaay taboo.  
The point that I wanted to make with this blog post is that whether a friend’s loved one died of a long life struggling with cancer or whether a friend’s loved one died due to suicide, the friend is still grieving over the death of their loved one.  
If we are to remove the taboo label off of certain causes of death, we must as a society view death as death no matter how someone dies. In so doing, we may more openly support each other as we, in our own ways, grieve over the deaths of our loved ones. 
Let go of the shackles of silence.  
We can move beyond this, 

S


Being an Extremely Sensitive Empath has Its Challenges but The Great Outdoors is Healing: Sterling Sinclair Goes Barefoot Tree Hugging, Walking, Bathing and Sunset Swimming, October 2017

Being an Extremely Sensitive Empath has Its Challenges but The Great Outdoors is Healing: Sterling Sinclair Goes Barefoot Tree Hugging, Walking, Bathing and Sunset Swimming, October 2017

If you are like me, people, yes people, people in general drain you.  The drama never ends whether it be on a sidewalk, at a friend’s house visiting, at a hospital or big stores like Walmart.  

  
Take us to a conference just to listen – bam – drain. 

Have us present – triple bam – ultra drain. 

  
If you are like me, you probably go out and socialize as seldom as possible and live like a hermit as much as possible.  

  
We are naturally social as well as reclusive.  It is an impossible life to live but we find our ways to live it. 

Over the past few weeks, I have had difficulty finding stability because I have been out and about.  

  
So when at my rural  waterfront studio in the woods, I have been seeking restoration.  

  
I hope that these videos give you a sense of peace, calm and home.  

This is a video of me heading out for a walk in the field. I just got back to the studio and immediately had to go for a walk: 

Sterling Sinclair heads out for a walk in the country
Once out in the woods, especially in the fall, I like to kick off my shoes and go walking barefoot in the leaves.  It is astonishingly grounding.  

  
This is a video of me walking barefoot through the leaves: 

Video: Sterling Sinclair goes Walking in the woods
I love it when nature starts to peacefully whisper to me and I am called to hug the trees.

  
 This video is raw and up close. I hope that you gain the sense of being one with the forest: 

Video: Sterling Sinclair Natural Tree Hugging
When I return, especially when it is at sunset or evening, I find that a nature swim or blessed bathing in the lake to be restorative.  I let the waters drain away any pain that I am shedding. 

  
This video is of my going into the lake barefoot. The water for the end of October is really warm. It was so magical with the light twinking on the lake as the sun set.  

Video: Sterling Sinclair kicks off his shoes and walks into the lake
For us extreme empaths, reconnecting with nature and the elements has a way of giving us a rest.  The above moments gave me times to cleanse and re-energize.  Do you do similar activities too. Do you find nature helpful? 

Much love, S 


Sterling Sinclair Remembers Gord Downie and Visits the Vigil in Kingston Ontario Oct 18 2017: Photos, Videos, Media Reports, and A Poetic Message

Sterling Sinclair Remembers Gord Downie and Visits the Vigil in Kingston Ontario Oct 18 2017: Photos, Videos, Media Reports, and A Poetic Message

I aspire to be half the man Gord Downie was.  

  
He set an admirable standard whether be family man, activist, musician, poet, or human. 

  
 I never met Mr. Downie, I am a fan like so many other Canadians and beyond.  

  
His bravery to show love and express his passion for justice and life, oozed from his every syllable.

  
 It was an honour to visit the vigil.

  
am so thankful that the city of Kingston provided us the opportunity to sit with our memories of Gord and reflect upon how he inspired each and every one of us.    

  
Many, many people went to the vigil. The signatures signed on the memory banner had to have been in the thousands. 

One Kashechewan First Nation, on James Bay, gentleman visited the vigil earlier in the day.  This is an exerpt from the Whig: 

“He fought for us, for so many things,” Nakogee said. “That really means a lot. The first time I heard somebody that really fought for us was Gordie. We don’t hear that other bands do stuff for First Nations people. Gordie fought for us.

“It’s good that he did that, but it’s sad that he lost the battle. Now he is in our spirits.”

Nakogee was among dozens of people who gathered in Springer Market Square under a cloudless sky and unseasonably warm temperatures to pay their respects to The Tragically Hip’s lead singer, who died Tuesday night after a year-and-a-half-long battle with brain cancer.

Downie’s work to bring attention to the history of residential schools in Canada was among the last chapters in his life and one that fan Richard Noble said many people, including himself, knew nothing about.”

The Whig Article
This is a short video that I took when I went the vigil in Kingston. By the time I got there, only a small number of people were there. The intimate silence was like walking in the air of a hug. 

Video: Sterling Sinclair visits Gord Downie Vigil in Kingston
Today the headlines lit up the news in Gord Downie’s honour. I read not one negative word. 

In Rolling Stone, the voice of the family was expressed. It told of Mr. Downie’s truth: 

“Last night, Gord quietly passed away with his beloved children and family close by,” his family wrote in a statement. “Gord knew this day was coming – his response was to spend this precious time as he always had – making music, making memories and expressing deep gratitude to his family and friends for a life well lived, often sealing it with a kiss … on the lips.

“Gord said he had lived many lives,” they added. “As a musician, he lived ‘the life’ for over 30 years, lucky to do most of it with his high school buddies. At home, he worked just as tirelessly at being a good father, son, brother, husband and friend. No one worked harder on every part of their life than Gord. No one.”

“Thank you everyone for all the respect, admiration and love you have given Gord throughout the years,” his family wrote following his death. “Those tender offerings touched his heart and he takes them with him now as he walks among the stars.”

“In the wake of his diagnosis, Gord only fought harder for what he believed in: social justice, environmentalism and reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples,” he added. “Gord did not rest from working for the issues he cared about, and his commitment and passion will continue to motivate Canadians for years to come … He will be sorely missed.”

Rolling Stone article
Today I sat down to process my grief and to reflect upo the person of Gord Downie. As an Auracature artist I began to draw an Auracature, just as I did the night before photos of me leaving the drawing at the vigil are posted below, but thid time, I began writing a message inspired by Gord Downie. 

  
Sterling Sinclair Recites the Message
Gord Downie poem

Oct 19, 2017

“Her Children Die from Centuries of Pain

Kick off your shoes – go dance in the rain.”

“Together We Are One”

By Sterling Sinclair

“Remember not me

Remember the work to be done

It was never about my battle

Their stories had to be sung

The battle’s not over

Much work’s need done

We fight the battle together

Until the battle is won

Upon blood soaked prairies

She gathers her young

How’d she wake in her mourning

Her fallen knight was her son

How can she see the light

From fear we mustn’t run

Look into her black brown eyes

Reserved, her soul was shunned

The fight to live’s not over

The fight has just begun.

Oh Canada, do you even listen?

Sorrow is being Sung

Grieve not my recent passing

Seeking justice is not fun

My death is not the message

I’m a husband, father, son

First peoples are in danger

No matter the spin that is spun

Pour your tears upon the lands

Cuz, healing’s barely begun

If you honour my memory

If I am Canada’s true son

Instead of being saddened

Go out and help someone

The war will be over

The battle will be won

When all people come together

And together we are one.”

The following are photos of my experience at the vigil

   
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
   
   
 
  

Gord, rest in peace. 

To Gord’s loved ones, I send my sincerest condolences. 

Much Love, Sterling Sinclair

Sterling Sinclair’s Site 


Sterling Sinclair How to Naked Tree Hugging and Barefoot Hiking Video is His Most Viewed Video on Facebook.  Do People like Nudity or is the Video Informative? You Decide.

Sterling Sinclair How to Naked Tree Hugging and Barefoot Hiking Video is His Most Viewed Video on Facebook. Do People like Nudity or is the Video Informative? You Decide.  
How To: Naked Tree Hugging and Barefoot Hiking may Help You Heal, be Grounded, feel Free to Live. 

 Many indigenous rituals are performed without clothing or with minimal clothing.

Skinny-dipping has been a favourite for young and old alike. 

But have you tried naked tree hugging or nude hiking?

 How about walking in the leaves barefoot? 

 I posted this video “How To” on my Facebook timeline and it has gotten record views. 

The Naked Tree Hugging and Barefoot Walking YouTube Video Above
 In this how to demonstration, I am wearing my hiking shorts just to make sure nothing accidentally swings into the picture and forces an “Adult” video rating.  But the way it is shot, it gives the viewer a good feel for what it is like to be one with nature. 

 I hope this video encourages you to kick off your shoes, walk through those fallen autumn leaves and hug a tree. You’ll be glad you did. 

Cheers, S

Sterling’s Page


#MeToo: Sterling Sinclair, A Sexual Assault Survivor, Reads a Poem about the Quest for Truth, October 17, 2017

#MeToo: Sterling Sinclair, A Sexual Assault Survivor, Reads a Poem about the Quest for Truth, October 17, 2017

  
Sterling Sinclair Reads the Poem 

#metoo I wrote this poem a few years back. It concludes: I keep walking into tomorrow, no matter what happened to me yesterday. I do not know your pain. But I know the feeling of keeping sexual assault buried in secret vaults at which I laid flowers of grief for many years. I am still not sure if opening the vault was a good idea. We all deal with assault differently and in our own ways. I think that is why I like this poem so much. It asks unanswerable questions but speaks to heart of survival.
Much love, S